Archive for month: July, 2012

Converted Windmill for Sale: Grays, Essex

18 Jul
July 18, 2012

A majestic listed 5 bedroom steam mill / windmill for sale.

Thought to date from 1674, Baker Street Mills is a magnificent hexagonal windmill. One of the last three examples of a smock mill remaining in Essex, which is now Listed grade II. It was an operating windmill until 1912 from when it fell into disrepair and then restored into a private residence in 1981. The current vendors completed their restoration of the windmill in 1999 including the renovation of the sails which are fully operational.

The windmill itself has been converted into fabulous accommodation which is complemented by the converted Victorian steam mill. Much of the original workings of both mills have been retained and incorporated within the accommodation giving a real feel of the past and heritage of this magnificent residence.

The Mill stands within grounds extending to about 10 acres, accessed via electrically operated gates. The property also features a double garage, pool house and what every pool house needs, a swimming pool.

Asking price of £1,500,000
More details can be read here.

 

Renovation Project: Terraced Cottage – Clifton, Bristol

18 Jul
July 18, 2012

Not too much information on this renovation project as I think that the pictures speak for themselves.

Renovation project – a period terraced cottage in a popular Clifton location in need of complete refurbishment. Excellent location within just a few hundred yards of Whiteladies Road and Durdham Downs. Also handy for St John’s School and Clifton Village.

  • Ground Floor: entrance hallway, sitting room, reception 2/study/bedroom 2
  • First Floor: bedroom 1
  • Outside: small front courtyard garden, outbuildings at the rear which could be adapted or demolished to create a rear courtyard garden
  • Exciting potential for private individuals and developers alike to transform this dilapidated property into something special
  • Sold with no onward chain
It’s on the market for £250,000.
A few more details such as floor plan and EPC are available here.

Inspiration: Butler Residence – Cyclist’s Dream Home

18 Jul
July 18, 2012

Avid cyclists who race nationally and internationally, Tim and Sue Butler began their new home search looking for a place with a garage to store their bikes. They ended up spending over a million dollars building a dramatic three-story home with a roof deck, giving them a 360-degree view of the city. A separate 600-square-foot “garage” houses their 22 bikes plus many other extras a bike enthusiast might want, from a hot-water washing station for muddy bikes to a sauna, fitness room and fix-it station. Surely a athlete’s/cyclist’s dream home.

Tim and Sue Butler’s new house in Portland, Oregon is a dramatic three-story wood and glass contemporary with a roof deck far above neighboring roofs. The house is narrow and tall, reflecting a narrow lot, and looks like a mini, modern, wood clad version of a high rise. Horizontal wood slats compensate for its verticalness, and a cedar wall that rings the house and garage creates the look of a compound. Sliding exterior louvers act as sun screens.

Portland designer Corey Martin chose sturdy, simple interior materials. A white oak-paneled kitchen opens up to a dining room with a long, white oak table with two benches (shown here, with the Butlers) that sit under 20-foot high ceilings.

Floating wood stairs, suspended by stainless steel rods, lead to the second floor. There are radiant heated concrete floors, concrete countertops, plaster walls that echo the look of the stucco outside and a central concrete column-shaped chimney that goes up through the middle of the house, serving fireplaces on all three floors.

In the bike garage there’s a sauna and a fitness room with a rack of dumbbells, a trainer cycle and a large piece of equipment for squats, chin ups and leg presses. The bathroom has a large glass shower.

 

So whilst it may not be every cyclist’s dream home, as many other homes have a big garage to store bicycles it is nontheless an inspiring property and one I have wanted to feature because I am myself a keen cyclist.

Project: Derelict Barns for sale – Gaydon Farm Barns, Gaydon

17 Jul
July 17, 2012

Traditional Derelict Barns For Conversion at Gaydon Farm

Here we have a total of 6 units for sale.

  • Unit 1 – Gross external area 1,260 ft² (117m2)
  • Unit 2 – Gross external area 3,400 ft² (318m2)
  • Unit 3 – Gross external area 1,150 ft² (107m2)
  • Unit 4A – Gross external area 1,980 ft² (184m2)
  • Unit 4B – Gross external area 1,880 ft² (175m2)
  • Unit 5 – Gross external area 1,259 ft² (117m2)

A range of buildings with detailed planning permission to convert to six dwellings with two conversions/part new builds, situated in the village of Gaydon close to the M40 in south Warwickshire. The barns extend to approximately 1,018m2 (10,929 ft² measured gross externally) on a site area extending to 0.69 acres in total.

The planning consent is subject to conditions of which each prospective purchaser should be aware. A copy of the consent is available to view at the agent’s Rugby office, there is further information available on the estate agent’s website.

In order to buy these you will need to find £675,000.

19/06/12
Update: Sold – Subject to Terms

Inspiration: Garage Conversion – The Shed Residence

17 Jul
July 17, 2012

The Shed Residence by Richard Peters Associates.

This tiny garage in Sydney, Australia has operated as a motorcycle repair shop, secondhand washing machine warehouse, a builder’s workshop, and most recently a studio for local artists. Its most recent incarnation is the conversion into a two bedroom, two batroom home.

Tucked away at the end of a lane in the Sydney suburb of Randwick, close to The Spot and in walking distance to Coogee beach, is this 74 sqm simple brick industrial structure built in 1890 by two Irish blacksmiths to house their coach building business.

Having grown up in the area, the owners knew the building well and when it came up for sale in 2003, took a leap of faith and invested in a project that presented an exciting opportunity. They decided to convert it into a smaller, sustainable and more efficient way to live, while challenging the convention that ʻbigger is betterʼ.

The building has a north-facing roof that has been set up with solar panels to harness the sun, there are operable doors and windows from north to south to allow good cross ventilation so there is no need for air conditioning, while the thermal mass of the concrete floor holds the winter sun to warm the building in the colder months. Along the southern wall a full bank of storage on ground level and on the first level has been installed as an effective insulator from the adjoining passage.

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