Tag Archive for: England

Oast House for Conversion for Sale: Ashford, Kent

16 Jan
January 16, 2014

Description

A redundant Oast House for conversion for sale with planning consent to form single dwelling together with the creation of amenity space and garage, situated in a rural location with about 13 acres.

Information

Situated in an idyllic rural setting, within a dedicated Special Landscape Area, Upper Boy Court Oast is an unconverted former oast house and dairy constructed mainly of brick and Bethersden marble set under a tiled roof.

Planning permission has been granted for conversion into a 3/4 bedroom house comprising an entrance hall, living room, open plan kitchen and family room, roundel dining room with part vaulted ceiling and mezzanine study (accessed via first floor), separate cloak/boot room and guest suite on the ground floor with two bedroom suites and study/bedroom 4 on the first floor.
the property sits in a rural and quiet location towards the end of a ‘no through’ road, surrounded by farmland, orchards and woodland and is convenient for Headcorn station and village which lie about 2.5 miles away.

Upper Boy Court Oast benefits from just under 2 acres of gardens (not yet landscaped) and an adjoining field of about 11.5 acres which is hedge enclosed and down to grazing. To the front there is parking for a number of cars whilst to the north-west lies a large timber outbuilding incorporating a double garage, tractor garage, garden store, workshop and refuse and recycle store.


Location: Boy Court Lane Headcorn, Ashford, TN27 9LA
Guide price: Offers Over £550,000 / Freehold
House size: 3/4 Bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 1,986 square feet
Features: 13 acres, rural location, double garage

Further details can be found here.

Property Inspiration: Converted Defence Tower, Suffolk

28 Nov
November 28, 2012

This unique converted defence tower was designed by Piercy&Co. They have written the following about how they changed a historic relic into a private residence.

Converting a Napoleonic defence tower built in 1808 into a 21st Century private residence was a demanding brief. As a Scheduled Monument on the At Risk register and located in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the planning negotiations were matched in complexity by the on-site logistics. The completed conversion won the support of English Heritage who heralds it as an exemplar of how to convert significant historical buildings.

The new roof follows many of the curves within the original building while the 3 metre thick solid bonded brick walls (originally designed to withstand cannon fire from the North Sea) create a massive base from which the new roof is tethered.

The simplicity of this massive form in the landscape hides the complexity and beauty of the plan and geometry.

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