Tag Archive for: Lake

Property Inspiration: Summer Boathouse in More og Romsdal, Norway

08 Dec
December 8, 2013

Architecture Inspiration

The boathouse is a cultural and historical hallmark of Norways coastal regions, where fishing used to be the primary profession. They have traditionally been used for storing boats and fishing gear, but today many of them are being converted for recreational summer use. This particular boathouse is located on the outermost reaches of the Moere-coast, and it hails from the middle of the eighteenth century. It was in such a bad state that the owner decided to tear it down and build it anew. The simplicity of the old building, its good placement and honest use of materials would become key sources of inspiration for the design of the new building. Great emphasis was placed on the main construction, the gates of the gable wall and the adaptable long facade.

Information

The disclosed and somewhat unavailable location made material-reuse very desirable. Old windows from a nearby farmhouse were collected and sorted. The placement of these windows became key in deciding what distance to use between the pillars in the main construction.
During the process of tearing down the old boathouse it was discovered that the structure had been built on unstable clay-ground. The new building therefore rests on H-profiles eight meters in length, spanning across a crevice in the bedrock. The white painted main construction of the new boathouse was built on site. In order to ease the foundation work, parts of the wall construction is resting directly on mountainous ground.


Location: Aure Kommune, More og Romsdal, Norway
Built by: TYIN tegnestue Architects
Architects: Marianne Lobersli Sorstrom, Yashar Hanstad

Further details can be found here.

Property Inspiration: Log Cabin – Lake Simcoe, Ontario

01 Jan
January 1, 2013

Nestled into a slope on the southern shore of Lake Simcoe, this one room sleeping log cabin is a simple but sophisticated Canadian bunkie, evoking the “primitive hut” of branches constructed in the wilderness.

The clients desired a private retreat from the main cottage further up the hill that would also enhance their enjoyment of the surrounding landscape in a location previously used to watch the sunset.

The fully insulated glass cabin is encased on three sides by cedar slats.
A green roof is planted with sedums and herbs to camouflage views of the cabin from the main cottage. The minimal furnishing includes a bed with built-in drawers, a wall of storage cabinets and a wood-burning stove. All interior surfaces, including floor and ceiling, are fabricated of birch veneer plywood.

The changes of both season and time of day continuously transform the cabin’s presence and dynamics with the landscape. With trees in full leaf, it recedes into the vegetation, integrating architecture with landscape. In winter with ground and lake unified under a blanket of white, the horizontal lines of the slats are distinguished against the vertical rhythm of bare tree trunks. By day, the interior experience is a play between light and shadow as sunlight filters through the screen, projecting ever-changing patterns onto the floor. The random gaps provide abstract snapshots of vegetation, lake and sky. After dusk the effect is reversed — cloaked in darkness, the cabin evokes a lantern-like quality, radiating golden electric light from between the slats.

To simplify the complications of working at a remote, sloping site, the project was prefabricated in a parking lot in Toronto over a period of four weeks. Components were numbered, disassembled and reconstructed on site in just ten days. Prefabrication reduced costs by decreasing construction time and labour costs during installation and brought minimum disruption to the landscape.

For high resolution images and some information about the architects take a look here.

© Copyright - Property Oddity
UA-34089806-1