Tag Archive for: Property

Property Inspiration: Log Cabin – Lake Simcoe, Ontario

01 Jan
January 1, 2013

Nestled into a slope on the southern shore of Lake Simcoe, this one room sleeping log cabin is a simple but sophisticated Canadian bunkie, evoking the “primitive hut” of branches constructed in the wilderness.

The clients desired a private retreat from the main cottage further up the hill that would also enhance their enjoyment of the surrounding landscape in a location previously used to watch the sunset.

The fully insulated glass cabin is encased on three sides by cedar slats.
A green roof is planted with sedums and herbs to camouflage views of the cabin from the main cottage. The minimal furnishing includes a bed with built-in drawers, a wall of storage cabinets and a wood-burning stove. All interior surfaces, including floor and ceiling, are fabricated of birch veneer plywood.

The changes of both season and time of day continuously transform the cabin’s presence and dynamics with the landscape. With trees in full leaf, it recedes into the vegetation, integrating architecture with landscape. In winter with ground and lake unified under a blanket of white, the horizontal lines of the slats are distinguished against the vertical rhythm of bare tree trunks. By day, the interior experience is a play between light and shadow as sunlight filters through the screen, projecting ever-changing patterns onto the floor. The random gaps provide abstract snapshots of vegetation, lake and sky. After dusk the effect is reversed — cloaked in darkness, the cabin evokes a lantern-like quality, radiating golden electric light from between the slats.

To simplify the complications of working at a remote, sloping site, the project was prefabricated in a parking lot in Toronto over a period of four weeks. Components were numbered, disassembled and reconstructed on site in just ten days. Prefabrication reduced costs by decreasing construction time and labour costs during installation and brought minimum disruption to the landscape.

For high resolution images and some information about the architects take a look here.

Contemporary House for Sale: Higham, Colchester

07 Nov
November 7, 2012

This property sums up property oddity. For sale in Higham, Colchester is this contemporary house set in extensive grounds and designed in the 1970s house by Peter Aldington. It’s in a style influenced by Mies van der Rohe.

It seems pretty pricey for what it is however, a three bedroom house with one en-suite.

The house is an important example of post-war British architecture and was commissioned in the 1970’s. Completed in 1974, it received an architectural award in 1978 from the Royal Institute of British Architects. The design is strongly influenced by the iconic Farnsworth House of Mies van der Rohe but has its own unique interior and exterior qualities. It features in a recent RIBA book by Alan Powers, and has been photographed at night for inclusion in a forthcoming volume on post-war British architecture. In the 70’s and 80’s it featured in the Architectural Journal and House and Garden.

It is a contemporary glasshouse with glass wrapping two thirds of the exterior and sits a metre from the ground on steel columns. It is entered across a bridge through a cantilevered door. The visitor is immediately struck by the sense of floating – an unrestricted connection with the grounds with their mature trees, and beyond across the valley.

The gardens are a maze that totals about 9.1 acres.

It is on the market for £1,999,000 with more details available here.

 

Property Inspiration: Caterpillar House, Feldman Architecture

17 Oct
October 17, 2012

The design for the Caterpillar House, sited on the softly rolling hills of the Santa Lucia Preserve, sought to accentuate a connection to the land.  Having lived in a Cliff May home, the client came to the project with a love of modern ranch houses and looking for an environmentally-conscious response to a beautiful site.  The Caterpillar House implements sustainable elements while exploring a contemporary version of the ranch ideals: massing that is low and horizontal, an open plan with a strong connection between indoor and outdoor spaces, and main living areas which center informally on the kitchen.

Connecting literally and figuratively to the site, excavated earth was repurposed for the construction of the walls.  These rammed earth walls gently curve in response to the site’s contours and also act as a thermal mass, regulating temperatures from day to night.  Capturing rainwater for irrigation, three tanks proudly sit close to the home – a clear sign of the available water resources for landscape.  Large south-facing glass doors open the main living area to a large covered contemporary porch and to an outdoor patio with sunshades that expand and contract to allow for a flexible entertaining area that responds to the client’s needs.  The glazing, natural ventilation and operable shading also act as a passive heating and cooling system, cooling the house in the summer and warming the house in winter.  Integrated photovoltaic panels enable the house to produce all of its energy requirements without compromising the graceful curve of the low roof against the hill.

The Caterpillar House is the first LEED Platinum Custom Home of the California Central Coast.

Further details about the house and Feldman Architecture can be found here.

Inspiration: Lake Shore Drive House – Chicago, Illinois

10 Aug
August 10, 2012

Wheeler Kearns Architects have designed the Lake Shore Drive House in Chicago, Illinois.

Located in the Lakeview neighborhood of Chicago, this single family residence on Lake Shore Drive opens directly onto the parkway with unobstructed views of Lake Michigan.The house takes its form from its site; the base of the residence is rendered as a solid mass, forming a plinth that grounds the house on its prominent corner location.  The plinth is carved into and becomes more open towards the lake side of the house.  An interlocking volume that rises from the plinth reinforces the opening toward the lake; as the volume springs from the plinth, a double-high aperture is created that provides an expansive view from the living room towards Lake Michigan.

The split-level plan creates spaces of various scales and experiences that share in the east view towards the park and lake.

 

Inspiration: Casa Grécia by Isay Weinfeld

26 Jul
July 26, 2012

The Casa Grécia by Isay Weinfeld is located on a large corner plot of land with plenty of natural vegetation where an Eco-system of 1,900 square meters of plants exist within the São Paulo home. The only visible portion of the home is a short concrete structure with a vibrant yellow door. A green Ivy plant climbs up the concrete, giving visitors a little insight of the plant life inside.

Brazilian architect Isay Weinfeld has combined nature with architecture and does so throughout the property. For example, areas within the home, where there are large trees that have became preserved by the architecture. At one point  a tree and rocks surrounded by glass windows can be seen reaching though the ceiling.

Another similar moment happens when an entire indoor garden of small palm trees and shrubbery bask in sun under a series of square and rectangular skylights. The inclusion of the plants assist in keeping temperatures cool and creates an authentic feeling throughout the home.

The owner of the home has an antique car collection which was in need of proper display and preservation. In respect to his clients passion, Weinfeld created a pebble driveway which leads to a stark white museum-like garage, where the vintage automobiles are protected and displayed behind tempered crystal clear glass.

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